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Status of the Red-tailed Chipmunk (Tamias ruficaudus) in British Columbia Nagorsen, DAvid
2004
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D
Abstract: This species status report describes the distribution, habitat, biology, population size and trends, limiting factors and threats, existing protection or species designations, significance of the species. The Red-tailed Chipmunk (Tamias ruficaudus) is confined to a small geographic area in the Rocky and Columbia Mountains of Montana, Idaho, Washington, Alberta, and British Columbia. Two subspecies are recognized: T. r. ruficaudus and T. r. simulans. In British Columbia, T. r. ruficaudus inhabits a narrow elevational zone (1785?1950 m) in the extreme southern Rocky Mountains of British Columbia. T. r. simulans occupies a broad elevational range (560?1829 m) in the southern Selkirk Mountains of British Columbia where its range is delimited by the Columbia and Kootenay Rivers. The two subspecies represent nationally significant populations and warrant separate rankings. The British Columbia Conservation Data Centre currently ranks T. r. ruficaudus as S2 because of its limited range. Although it has a limited distributional range in British Columbia, much of its Canadian range occurs within protected areas (Waterton Lakes National Park, Akamina-Kishinena Provincial Park). Except for the possible effects of fire suppression, no threats are known. T. r. simulans is ranked as S3S4. Its distributional range in British Columbia is restricted to a small area in the southern Selkirk Mountains, where it inhabits a broad elevational range and a variety of habitats, including early successional stages. No threats are known and there is no evidence of population or habitat declines. Priorities for conserving and managing this species include inventories in the mountains west of the Flathead River valley and south of Crowsnest Pass, areas on the north side of the Kootenay River near Nelson and the west side of the Columbia River near Trail. A high priority for management is a study on the role of fire in maintaining habitat.
 
Nagorsen, DAvid. 2004. Status of the Red-tailed Chipmunk (Tamias ruficaudus) in British Columbia. Ministry of Environment. Wildlife Working Report. WR 115
 
Topic: Species status
Keywords: bc, species status, species conservation and management, tamias, red tailed, redtailed
ISSN:  Scientific Name: Neotamias amoenus, Neotamias ruficaudus ruficaudus, Neotamias ruficaudus simulans, Neotamias minimus, Neotamias ruficaudus
ISBN: 978-0-7726-6288-0 English Name: Least Chipmunk, Red-tailed Chipmunk, Ruficaudus Subspecies, Red-tailed Chipmunk, Yellow-pine Chipmunk, Red-tailed Chipmunk, Simulans Subspecies
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