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Recovery Plan for the Olive Clubtail (Stylurus olivaceus) in British Columbia B.C. Ministry of Environment
2017
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Abstract: The Olive Clubtail (Stylurus olivaceus) is a large (56?60 mm), dull grey-green dragonfly with large distinctive bright blue eyes; a pale green face with a thin, dark horizontal line; a black abdomen marked by a yellow stripe, or spot, at the top of each segment and yellow lateral stripes. The Olive Clubtail is the only representative of the genus Stylurus in the province. The Olive Clubtail was designated as Endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) in 2011 but is not listed on Schedule 1 of the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). The species range in Canada is restricted to the South Okanagan and Thompson river valleys in southern British Columbia. Within this restricted range, there are 24 known sites for the species grouped into six populations. Five populations are considered extant, and one is considered historical. Olive Clubtail habitat is within small areas along warm, lowland rivers, with a few sites at lakes. The dragonfly has three life stages, each with specific habitat requirements. The egg and nymph life stages reside within the abovementioned freshwater habitats, with the nymph taking up to 2 years to develop. The adults are terrestrial and active from July to October. Threats to Olive Clubtail populations and habitat are a combination of cumulative shoreline habitat loss from urban, commercial, agricultural, and recreational development; non-native invasive predatory fish and the growth and spread of Eurasian water-milfoil; dams and water management within the freshwater ecosystems of all populations; recreational activities that generate wave wash from boats and other motorized craft along the shoreline; the potential for pollution of waterways from accidental chemical spills along transportation routes; and climate change. The recovery (population and distribution) goal is to maintain the abundance of Olive Clubtail populations at all extant sites within the province, including any additional populations that may be identified in the future. The recovery objectives for Olive Clubtail are: 1. to secure protection for the known extant sites of Olive Clubtail with no loss or degradation of occupied aquatic habitat; 2. to confirm the distribution of Olive Clubtail within its range in British Columbia; 3. to assess the extent of threats to each of the extant sites and reduce their impacts; 4. to address knowledge gaps (e.g., habitat requirements for each life stage, dispersal, etc.); and 5. to increase the public knowledge of Olive Clubtail and its associated freshwater and terrestrial habitats. In British Columbia, the Olive Clubtail is ranked S2 (Imperiled) by the Conservation Data Centre and is on the provincial Red list. The B.C. Conservation Framework ranks the Olive Clubtail as a priority 1 under goal three (maintain the diversity of native species and ecosystems). Recovery is considered to be biologically and technically feasible.
 
B.C. Ministry of Environment. 2017. Recovery Plan for the Olive Clubtail (Stylurus olivaceus) in British Columbia. Province of British Columbia, Minstry of Environment. Recovery Plan
 
Topic: Recovery Planning
Keywords: 
ISSN:  Scientific Name: Stylurus olivaceus
ISBN:  English Name: Olive Clubtail
Other Identifier: 
 
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