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Effects of Habitat Fragmentation on Amphibians: What Do We Know and Where Do We Go From Here? (in Proc. Conference Biology & Management of Species and Habitats at Risk) Wind, Elke
1999
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Abstract: Numerous studies across North America indicate that clearcuts and second-growth stands are unsuitable habitat for amphibians compared to old-growth forests. As landscapes become increasingly fragmented, amphibian populations in remaining old-growth patches are isolated. Insularization leads to decreased genetic fitness within populations and may lead to local extirpations or extinctions of species. Because amphibians have low vagility, high philopatry, and are susceptible to desiccation, they may be particularly vulnerable to habitat fragmentation. I present a general overview of impacts of forest practices and habitat fragmentation on amphibian populations, highlighting key management issues: forest patch size, importance of wet areas, and connectivity. I draw examples from studies that have specifically investigated effects of habitat fragmentation, clearcutting, and habitat juxtaposition to address the following questions...
 
Wind, Elke. 1999. Effects of Habitat Fragmentation on Amphibians: What Do We Know and Where Do We Go From Here? (in Proc. Conference Biology & Management of Species and Habitats at Risk). Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks. Proceedings - Conference Biology & Management. Vol. 2
 
Topic: Species and Ecosystems at Risk
Keywords: amphibians, area effects, forestry, fragmentation, isolation, patch size
ISSN:  Scientific Name: Rana sylvatica, Plethodon vehiculum, Taricha granulosa, Dicamptodon tenebrosus, Rana pretiosa
ISBN:  English Name: Western Red-backed Salamander, Coastal Giant Salamander, Oregon Spotted Frog, Wood Frog, Rough-skinned Newt
Other Identifier: University College of the Cariboo
 
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