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Streamline; Vol. 4; No. 4; Winter 1999 Underhill, Donna (editor)
1999
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Abstract: Soil bioengineering is the use of living plant materials to perform specific engineering functions (Schiechtl, 1980). This method can be used to treat seepage zones and control erosion by stabilizing steep slopes (Gray and Leiser, 1982); it can also be used in construction and riparian restoration. Soil bioengineering fits well in the successional reclamation model developed by Polster (1989). Successional reclamation seeks to reintegrate the disturbed site into the natural successional processes that serve to vegetate sites. It is possible to develop systems designed to stabilize anthropogenic disturbances by investigating how natural revegetation systems stabilize natural disturbances (Polster and Bell, 1980; Straker, 1996). Certain pioneering species that are found on naturally disturbed sites have the ability to root from cuttings, to grow following burial, and to grow under harsh conditions: these characteristics make such species useful for soil bioengineering.
 
Underhill, Donna (editor). 1999. Streamline; Vol. 4; No. 4; Winter 1999. Ministry of Environment, Watershed Restoration Program. Streamline. Vol. 4. No. 4
 
Topic: Conservation + Management (Ecosystems-Habitat)
Keywords: soil bioengineering, watershed, seepage, restoration
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